Winter Exercising With Hearing Aids

When exercising, how can you best keep your hearing aid dry? Should you even wear them in the first place? Is there gear that offers protection? Exercising with hearing aids can be tricky. Exercising with hearing aids in the winter can be even trickier.

Should I Wear Hearing Aids?

Yes, despite the temperature and season, your hearing aids are crucial for outdoor activities. You want to be aware of your surroundings at all times. If you’re with a group, you want to be able to hear them. If alone, it’s important to be able to place yourself in space, to hear what’s nearby.

Make sure your aids don’t get wet, though. Moisture is an aid’s number one enemy.

What Gear Should I Get?

Sweatbands can help prevent water from dripping down and pooling into your ears. Used on your wrist or forehead, these easily allow you to wipe away or stop any perspiration that could potentially damage your device.

Ear Gear products — spandex sleeves that fit over whatever hearing device you have — also offer a convenient solution. According to their website: “Ear Gear has a unique double wall of spandex that provides protection against sweat, rain, and moisture of all kinds….preventing it from reaching the hearing instrument’s microphone port, battery door, and sensitive interior circuitry.” They even have customizable products and sleeves for cochlear devices.

It’s not a bad idea to look into a hearing aid dehumidifier, either. A nightly drying in one of these portable containers can help keep your aid looking and working as good as new.

What Should I Do If My Aid Gets Wet?

Don’t panic! Take out the batteries and wipe down everything with a clean cloth. Use a Q-tip® to clean out the battery compartment. If you have a dehumidifier, place your aid in overnight, and if you don’t, try a ziplock bag with a silica gel packet. If after all these steps you feel your aid’s functionality has decreased, call your audiologist whenever you’re able.

What Exercise Is Best?

Any exercise is good, and frankly, we believe that with the right precautions, those with hearing loss can participate in any activity or sport. When it’s cold, running, jogging or walking are probably the most manageable. But even if you’re skiing or snowboarding, just keep your aids dry (or covered with Ear Gear or similar protections), use your dehumidifiers, and make sure you don’t lose them on the slopes (and always check any warranty information beforehand, just in case).

Happy Trails!